Be Safe and Use our Black and Coloured Inks


Our Black Inks have a drying time of 4 seconds and can be used both for hand paint, airbrush or reusable application

SHOP HERE FOR our SAFE INKS

Our Formulation is based on Government approved FDA Ingredients suitable as cosmetics and have an Australian Standrads No for safety

WE DO NOT USE PPD in any of our products at all. This is the problem with so many kids coming back from Thailand and Bali with scarring from “their” so called Tattoos

Temporary Tattoos Skin Printing

Here is full info on ppd

Allergy to paraphenylenediamine

Paraphenylenediamine was declared the Contact Allergen of the Year for 2006 by the American Contact Dermatitis Society (ACDS).

What is paraphenylenediamine and where is it found?

Paraphenylenediamine (PPD) is a chemical substance that is widely used as a permanent hair dye. It may also been found in textile or fur dyes, dark coloured cosmetics, temporary tattoos, photographic developer and lithography plates, photocopying and printing inks, black rubber, oils, greases and gasoline.

The use of PPD as a hair dye is popular because it is a permanent dye that gives a natural look. Hair can also be shampooed without becoming decoloured and perming to achieve waves or curls can be done without difficulty. PPD hair dyes usually come packaged as 2 bottles, one containing the PPD dye preparation and the other containing the developer or oxidizer. PPD is a colourless substance that requires oxygen for it to become coloured. It is this intermediate, partially oxidised state that may cause allergy in sensitive individuals. Fully oxidized PPD is not a sensitiser thus individuals with PPD allergy can wear wigs or fur coats dyed with PPD safely.

What are the reactions to PPD allergy?

Reaction caused by the use of hair dye in mild cases usually only involves dermatitis to the upper eyelids or the rims of the ears. In more severe cases, there may be marked reddening and swelling of the scalp and the face. The eyelids may completely close and the allergic contact dermatitis reaction may become widespread.

Severe allergy to PPD can result in contact urticaria and rarely, anaphylaxis.

People working with PPD such as hairdressers and film developers may develop dermatitis on their hands; patch testing usually reveals hypersensitivity to PPD. Occupational allergy to PPD has been found in a milk tester whom through laboratory work was in frequent contact with PPD solution. Dermatitis on the hands and occasional spreading to the arms and upper chest occurred.

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